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James Good
Jul 28, 2022
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According to cutting-edge research on technology recruiting, the current average interview process in the internet and tech industries is more than 24 days. And the 24 days doesn't include the time it takes to find and screen candidates before the interview begins. In other words, the phrase "good help is hard to find" still holds true in 2019. But if you're hiring product management talent, you're in luck. Today, this article aims to help you find, recruit, and hire product managers by building a product management talent funnel, while also helping job seekers see "what kind of product people are in demand" from an employer's perspective. Product Manager Talent Funnel The sales funnel is a pretty standard business concept these days. Based on on-site and off-site marketing, you have a large number of potential users. You can filter user bases based on their interests, affordability, etc., and then Latest Mailing Database target the best leads through sales tactics and drip marketing (a type of repeat-contact or repeated-prospect marketing) campaigns. In the end, only a small percentage of initial potential users will convert into end users. Recruiting talent follows the same lines. You have a bunch of candidates applying for open positions. They may have applied on their own initiative, or they may have been called in by a headhunter, HR, or hiring manager. Review resumes, screen most unqualified people, then conduct phone interviews, multiple rounds of face-to-face interviews, background checks, and then be notified. Some candidates will leave because they are less interested as they learn more about the position, while others leave because they are not a good fit for the position. Sound familiar? Below, in order to simplify the recruiting and hiring process for product managers, this article presents 8 steps for building and optimizing the product management talent funnel: 1. Diversify your product manager talent pool There are generally four ways to find product management candidates: Actively applying: They see your job ad and apply. Personal Relationships: You have gotten to know them and have personally assessed their interest in the job. Social Discovery: Although you may not know them personally, you already know each other (or through a series of acquaintances) to bond. Passive discovery: From their LinkedIn profile, they are a good fit for the role, so you (or your talent team) will approach them. While some people dislike these methods, there is no other perfect way to find potential best candidates. While some people who aren't actively looking for work seem more attractive, they may also be less likely to be poached by you because they're not particularly dissatisfied with where they are. And, while personal relationships are useful, there are plenty of great people outside your social circle. Therefore, you want to use as many resources as possible to create the most diverse possibilities. 2. Diversify your candidate list There is no perfect product manager resume, only personal preferences. Some people like to hire managers who can code, others want managers who can do sales. For some, marketing is a plus, while for others, analytics is a must. Since there is no universally agreed upon blueprint for the ideal product manager, don't limit candidate profiles based on personal biases, candidates from different backgrounds may surprise you. Here's a few words of advice: When faced with an engineer-turned-product manager candidate, make sure he really wants to be a product manager, rather than jumping ship because the job is better than coding or managing other developers ,is crucial.
From the recruitment process, learn how to be a good product person
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